STIX

Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays


STIX will fly to the Sun on board Solar Orbiter,
the European Space Agency’s next mission to the sun.

ROLE OF THE INSTITUTE FOR DATA SCIENCE


> Project lead

> Instrument design and construction

> Flight software, ground software

> Science

Principal investigator: Säm Krucker

Project manager: Stefan Kögl, KOEGL Space

Partners: international consortium, academy&industry

Funding: ESA, Swiss Space Office

Start: 2010
Status: Instrument delivered
Launch: 2020


Keywords: space sciences, solar physics, Solar Orbiter

 

SUMMARY

STIX is an X-ray telescope designed and built at FHNW. It is one of 10 instruments on board Solar Orbiter, the ESA spacecraft travelling closer to the sun than any spacecraft before. The mission collects information in multiple wavelengths for studying solar activity in unprecedented detail. This will bring us a big step closer to understanding the workings of our closest star. STIX will contribute to this goal by providing imaging spectroscopy of solar X-ray emission and information on accelerated electrons associated with solar flares. It will look at the very point where solar eruptions start.

PEOPLE @I4DS WORKING ON STIX

Prof. Dr. Arnold Benz

Senior Advisor

Prof. Dr. Hans-Peter Gröbelbauer

 

Dr. Matej Kuhar

Solar Physicist

Prof. Dr. André Csillaghy

Head Institute of Data Science

more information

Dr. Gordon Hurford

Computer Science Engineer

Dr. Francesca Molendini

Aerospace engineer

Laszlo Istvan Etesi

Computer Science Engineer

more information

Dr. Lucia Kleint

Astrophysicist

Hanna Sathiapal

Public Engagement Coordinator

more information

Dr. Oliver Grimm

Physicist

 

Prof. Dr. Säm Krucker

Principal Investigator

more information

Dominic Schori

Mechanical Engineer

OPEN RESOURCES AND RESULTS

VISUALS AND AUDIO

Artist’s impression of Solar Orbiter. Credit: ESA

Payload accommodation onboard Solar Orbiter. STIX is one of ten scientific instruments. Credit: ESA

The X-ray telescope consists of 32 pairs of grids mounted in front of 32 X-ray detectors which are located on the electronics box and make up the spectrometer. X-ray radiation passes through the windows in the heat shield, it is subsequently filtered by the imager unit and finally detected by the detector box – in order to obtain images of the hottest regions of solar eruptions with temperatures of up to 40 million degrees Celsius. Credit:

Der Sonne endlich so richtig nah kommen

by Radio SRF, 10.8.2018 | Interview mit Säm Krucker zum Start der Raumsonde Parker Solar Probe