SMILE SXI

Soft X-ray Imager


SXI is the X-rax instrument on the Chinese-European Mission SMILE
(Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer)

 

ROLE OF THE INSTITUTE FOR DATA SCIENCE


> Thermal design of SXI

> Imaging software

> Data analysis and interpretation

Project lead at I4Ds: Säm Krucker

Partners: FHNW IPP, ZHAW, University of Leicester, Koegl Space, Space Acoustics

Funding: Swiss Prodex

Start: December 2018
Launch: 2023


Keywords: space sciences, heliophysics, space weather, Smile mission

SUMMARY

The space mission SMILE will orbit the Earth in an elliptical pathway from 5000 km above the Earth to one third of the distance to the moon. While previous studies used observations from within or around Earth’s magnetic field, SMILE will take images and movies from outside of Earth’s protective magnetic shield. We will see the region where the solar wind slams into the Earth’s magnetic field. With these global and time dependent images, SMILE will revolutionize our understanding of the influences of space weather on our planet.

PEOPLE @FHNW WHO WORK ON SXI

Prof. Dr. André Csillaghy (I4DS)

Head Institute of Data Science

Manuela Dreier (IPP)

Student

Matthias Fankhauser (IPP)

Maschinenbauingenieur

Prof. Dr. Hans-Peter Gröbelbauer (IPP)

Maschinenbauingenieur

Prof. Dr. Säm Krucker (I4DS)

Astrophysicist

Anya Liebendörfer (I4DS)

Data Scientist

OPEN RESOURCES AND RESULTS

Presentation SMILE SXI at Transfer Transparent

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Image processing techniques are needed for separating the coronal mass ejection from the star field

Coronal mass ejections may create beautiful auroras but also disrupt satellites, radio communication and even electrical power grids.

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

Initial Presentation SMILE SXI

VISUALS AND AUDIO

The SMILE spacecraft will carry two imaging instruments – the wide field of view soft X-ray imager (SXI) and an auroral ultraviolet imager (UVI) – and an in situ measurement package that will work in conjunction with the imagers to explore the properties of the solar wind. Image credit: CAS/ESA

The Soft X-ray Imager SXI is one of four instuments onboard the SMILE spacecraft. It is a wide-field lobster-eye telescope with two X-ray-sensitive CCD detectors observing emissions from charged particles hitting the Earth’s magnetospheric boundaries. The FHNW astro-helio group will build the radiator for cooling the X-ray detectors and develop the imaging software. The four CAD-images above show the SXI instrument and the radiator. Image credit: U. Leicester, UK

Official video of the ESA-Chinese Academy of Sciences SMILE mission presented by NSSC. View video on YouTube

SMILE is a joint China – ESA mission to study the impact of the solar wind on the Earth’s magnetosphere. Artist’s conception by ESA/ATG medialab

Auroras (polar lights) are one example of  solar wind impacting the Earth. However, charged particles from the sun may affect our planet in many ways. Technology in space, e.g. satellites, is particularly at risk. Image: ESA/NASA

Stand 26.11. 2020: Nach dem Zusammenbau des Structure and Thermal Model (STM) von unserem Radiator Assembly (RadA) im Sommer, konnten wir im Oktober / November erfolgreich den Shock und Vibration Test an der FHNW durchführen. Trotz der Corona bedingten Einschränkungen hat alles sehr gut geklappt.

Nach diversen weiteren Tests wurde das RadA STM gereinigt und verpackt.

Heute haben wir heute das zugehörige Datenpaket mit mehr als 30 Dokumenten verschickt, für die Abnahme am 01.12.20 durch University of Leicester (UoL) und ESA /Prodex.
Die Auslieferung ist für den 07.12.2020 geplant.

Das MLI (Multi Layer Insulation) für das SXI STM, das unter unserer technischen Führung Teil des SXI Thermal Subsystems ist, wurde am 10.11.20 abgenommen und wird in den nächsten Tagen an UoL geliefert.
Somit wären dann alle Hardware Lieferungen für das SMILE SXI STM unter unserer Verantwortung komplett. Anfang 2021 starten wir dann voraussichtlich in die Phase C Extension die derzeit im Gespräch mit Prodex / SSO ist.

Bilder und Text: Stefan Koegl, Koegl Space